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anywhere, "mad money" with jim cramer starts now. don't go anywhere, "mad money" with jim cramer starts right now. >>> i'm jim cramer and welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game! firms are going to go out of business and he's nuts, they're nuts! they know nothing! i always like to say, there's a bull market somewhere and i promise -- "mad money," you can't afford to miss it. hey, i'm cramer! welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends, i'm just trying to make you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to teach and to coach, so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. listen up, okay! listen up! this, right here, this is europe, okay? this is the united states, all right? this, this is china, all right? we are here, they're over there. and they're over there, okay? you with me so far? we have 310 million people. these guys have about 739 million people. these guys have 1.3 billion people. i want you to keep this geography lesson in mind. because it is taking control of the averages on almost a daily basis and i can't do anything about i
are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk". jim is standing by at the cme in chicago. you've got the numbers. >> the numbers 352. and the claims number 368 on the continuing claims. it's about kind of where it is. the revision from last week up 2,000. so it's right kind of as expected. this was the big number. independent of last week's claims numbers over of last three weeks claims have been a big deal. they have indicated some sort of spring swoon. this is an indication how severe it is going to be. from the looks, it's not that big a deal. stock market up from that. these numbers came out as expected, which is not bad compared to two weeks ago. >> thank you for that. we've got reaction from steve liesman. are the numbers as positive as jim was portraying them? >> it's interesting, andrew. we have yet to see confirmation of that weak jobs report come up in the jobless claims. we have a speak up, some of it. now it has settled down back into that 350,000 range. you would think if it deteriorated as much as it has you would see som
morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with jim cramer who is tasting mcdonald's new breakfast lineup which we'll talk about this hour. got a triple whammy of dow, dupont, trafrlers, utx pretty good as futures are on the rise. day of reckoning, some have said, netflix soaring after last night's results. in europe, weak pmis out of germany, china, too, but the european markets are pricing in higher expectations this morning for a rate cut from the ecb. our road map begins with users streaming internet flicks, the house of cards paying off for the company and shares skyrocketing for the company. is it too late to buy the stock. >> we're counting down to apple's earnings report and that will be after the close. the shares over the $400 mark. one way or the other. >> luxury not dead, at least not according to coach and we'll dig deeper into those numbers. >> u.s. airways and delta beating those numbers. >> not quite as sanguine. we'll take a look at the airline sector and talk about travel turbulence a bit, as well. >> definitely not comericcal. >> for the fir
analyst mr. jim walsh. he joins me here in boston. >> cold boston. >> everyone is asking me, is it that cold in boston? it is. >> you're clearly not a native new englander. you picked a bad spot. >> we're in a wind tunnel. i'll ask you since we are here talking. did the fbi drop the ball in interviewing the older tsarnaev brother? >> i mean at a very simple level, based just on the outcome you would have to say yes. he interviewed him and he went on to commit an act. but i don't think we have the full answer here yet. what was the process that they followed? the fbi interviews a ton of folks every year. only a fraction of which are actually dangerous. they interview me when i go to aroon and north korea and come back. but obviously either they -- he fell through the cracks or at the time that they were interviewing him they weren't giving him anything actionable to continue his case. >> but, lou, he did visit russia, stayed there for six months. you feel the fbi dropped the ball? >> i'm not going to rush to judgment on this. i think we're going to have hearings where directo
quintanilla with jim cramer, david faber. after three days of triple digit moves on the dow, futures finally appear to be taking somewhat of a breather as we are knee-deep in earnings. lot of big names reporting today. jobless claims inching up a few moments ago. europe has had a pretty good bond auction, both in france and in spain. today, although italy's parliament still struggling to elect a president in their first vote. our road map begins with all that market volatility. we were up, then down, then up. we'll look at whether another triple digit move on the dow today could play out. >>> apple dipped below $400 a share yesterday. closed above that. this morning verizon reporting strong activations for the iphone for the last quarter. will that help this stock that's been in free fall? >>> pepsi beating expectations this morning. jim has an interview with the ceo. >>> paypal under pressure this morning, facing increased competition from amazon and others. we'll break down numbers and talk exclusive to john donahoe, ebay's ceo coming up. >>> futures on the rise after yesterday's drop of 1
the one and only jim kramler be joining us on the show. and twitter getting into the music wars. our guests say see it as an opportunity for everyone. we will dig into that as well. >> we will see you at 2. it's power house time. mike joins us now. he has received more awards than anyone in its 100 years. he is with prudential fox and roach realtors. welcome. >> nice to be here. thank you. >> let's talk a little bit about the greater philadelphia market. i understand that it is a very strong market right now. correct? >> yeah. we are having fun again. >> good. strongest market you have seen in quite some time? >> yes. strongest market since '05, '06. >> it sounds like it's a tight market? >> that's the big hustle right now. it is incredible how much we have sold in the last months. >> which probably explains the drop of 11% on the average days on the market. >> yes. average days on the market is down and the number of properties available is about 31%. it's the lowest inventory i have had since '04. >> let's take a look at the first offering. two bedrooms, one bath, just under 800 sq
that is the spot where the second bomb went off. former atf bomb investigator jim cavanaugh said it is obvious to him looking at the pictures. >> large injuries were on the side of it. debris field to the left. some protected areas over on the right side that indicate the blast was to one side of the trash receptacle. this was the scene of the blast. >> reporter: we are also seeing close-up photos of the actual pieces of the bomb. showing the pressure cooker deformed by the blast, one of its lids blown to the top of a nearby building. they are a favorite of bomb makers because explosive pressure builds up before it is released. investigators can now begin to trace down where components were bought since they know the maker of the pressure cooker, the type of rechargeable flashlight batteries used -- made in china, but widely available -- and even the type of wire -- also made in china -- used to hook the main components together. bomb technicians are examining two electronic components included in the bombs to see whether they were parts of timers or receivers for a remote detonation signal. a
to justice. [ cheers and applause ] >> heather: an amazing moment. jim gray is a sportscaster and fox news contributor. jim, what is it about a sporting event that can bring us altogether and allow us all to heal just a little bit, maybe for the moment? >> it's always been an escape. it's a chance to set aside all the problems that go on. it brings the community together. it allows everyone to have a place where they can vent their emotions and try and get away from the realities of life. it's been a great healing in many times of crisis throughout our country's history. >> heather: you've been a sportcast terrify for many years. this was done following 9/11. in the days that followed that, liza minelli and belting out new york, new york. that was september 21st. shoe share some of your reflections and times you remember events have been able to, country has been able to heal due to a sporting event? >> i don't think when president bush took the mound at yankee stadium and he threw out the first pitch. the whole thing had just been a month. it was still so very, very fresh. here the leader
witherspoon apparently had trouble walking the line. her and husband jim tot were arrested and jailed early friday morning for an alleged dui and disorderly conduct. according to the police report, while toth was given a sprite test, reese claimed he was not a real police officer so she was handcuffed but not before telling the officer, quote, do you know my name? >> that never works. >> you're about to find out who i am, end quote. in a statement witherspoon said she clearly had too much to drink and is deeply embarrassed. >>> three doors down bassisted to harrell was charged with vehicular homicide after causing a fatal crash that killed a 47-year-old man. harrell was intoxicated and also in possession of over 30 assorted prescription pills. >>> in another entertainment news, "oblivion" easily took first at the box office with $38 million. jennifer lawrence presented bill clinton with a glaad media award and ended up flubbing the president's name. >> we are happy to present glaad advocate change award to president glib -- bill clinton. >> it happens to all of us, you know. it comes up, yo
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
about you. >> very lovely. >>> someone we also think is lovely, cbs sportscaster jim nantz who we like. he reportedly had an elaborate plan to deal with the blackout at this year's super bowl. most of the superdome went dark in the third quarter. remember that? according to "sports business journal" says nantz he wanted to jump from the broadcast booth, grab a ledge and lower himself into the stands. from there, he wanted to run onto the field and report what was going on. lance barrow who was producing for cbs thought better of the idea and kept nantz in his seat. >> they're probably going thank you, lance barrow. doubt me, don't. jim nantz. >>> live television can be shall we say, a dicey thing, especially when mistakes can last forever on the internet. ben tracy shows us a north dakota tv news anchor who's learning that lesson the hard way. >> reporter: first days on the job can be tough. this one was awful. >> [ bleep ] gay. >> good evening, i'm van tieu. >> a.j. clemente apparently unaware he was on the air swore as he got flustered practicing his lines for hi
in and get out. at kathy and jim dougherty's house, several blocks away from the explosion, they came to broken glass and cracks in the ceiling authorities are allowing only some residents to see their homes. >> we're very, very fortunate. lot of people have lost everything. >> reporter: police closest to the worst damage were told overnight it could be another week before they get back in, they're still worried about broken gas pipes causing another deadly explosion. no one here wants to relive this. 14 people were killed. federal investigators are here. they still haven't shared what they think caused the plant to blow. the plant is several streets, several city blocks that way. workers there now, walls around the building are still crumbling and the fire there is still smoldering. they may have to live this way for months. for "good morning america," abc news, steve osunsami west, texas. >>> finally, the moscow circus, gave everyone a scare when he broke through his safety net, crashing to the floor, he got up with only a minor injury, take my word for it. it happened. >> thank you
that began with her husband, a hollywood agent jim toth was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol. winner's ponce she was worried about her has been and clearly had one drink too many but asserted her respect for lawful enforcement. at the time, it was more like, don't you know who i am? the voice of nbc's sunday night football was busted for drug driving. police say al michaels was arrested in santa monica california friday night just before a tad. he spent more than five hours in jail before being released. michaels was charged with misdemeanor d y and is due in court on june 26th. they are michael's nor nbc has commented on the charges. a really well respected sports figure. >> it happens to the best of them. we are going to take a break at 6:43 a.m. and a live look from our san mateo bridge camera. traffic is moving along fine. the sun as their and we will have full details on your weather coming out. medications? i don't know. last immunization shots? really? honey, what's my blood pressure medicine called? one time i took something and i blew up like a puffer fish
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
digital age. thank you. appreciate it. >> when we come back, we have jim cramer, stocks to watch and we'll talk about what has him fired up ahead of the opening bell. stick around. .. as soon as i met fiona and i was describing the problem we were having with our rear brakes, she immediately triaged the situation, knew exactly what was wrong with it, the car was diagnosed properly, it was fixed correctly i have confidence knowing that if i take to ford it's going to be done correctly with the right parts and the right people. get a free brake inspection and brake pads installed for just 49.95 after rebates when you use the ford service credit card. did you tell him to say all of that? no, he's right though... a lot can happen in a second. with fidelity's guaranteed one-second trade execution, we route your order to up to 75 market centers to look for the best possible price -- maybe even better than you expected. it's all part of our goal to execute your trade in one second. i'm derrick chan of fidelity investments. our one-second trade execution is one more innovative reason serious in
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
agricultural. thank you all very very much for being here. megan smith, jim kolbe and judson please come forward. we are going to go straight through the noon hour because of the numbers we have. some senators have been thinking of going in for lunch and other meetings that are taking place but we will begin with megan smith who is commissioner of the vermont commission of tourism appointed by -- in 2011. before that she was in the vermont legislature and before she became commissioner she and her husband owned and operated the vermont in which is a very nice place. for over a dozen years. ms. smith, go ahead. >> chairman lacie ranking member grassley members of the committee i'm pleased to be here today on behalf of the vermont department of tourism and marketing and the broader traveling community to highlight the importance of travel related provisions included in immigration reform. vermont is very dependent on tourism. our percentage of jobs in the industry is twice the natural -- national average of 38%. the majority of our businesses are small and family-owned and agri-tourism is
shrapnel designed to maim anyone standing by and jim avila has more. it's not hard to find out how to build one. >> reporter: it's not. investigators are learning more about the anatomy of the bombs and abc news confirming the common cooking appliance used in their construction was a midsize fager brand pressure cooker. unfortunately, the pot maker sells 50,000 a year of those in the united states. this is what remains of what investigators believe could be the crude but effective bomb used in boston. the american military knows them well. the pressure cooker bomb. homemade and designed to maim and kill. this video of military units detonating one in afghanistan posted on youtube. this one found on the internet from the streets of nepal. so common the department of defense handbook on spotting roadside bombs warns soldiers and marines to be on the lookout for that innocent pressure cooker and publications all over the internet teach the construction of a bomb made from mom's kitchen, why so popular? because pressure cookers seal so tightly and can be filled with nails and ball bearings and
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
, called it pure am necessary tifment jim sharp, a talk show host in phoenix promised that arizonans are still not taking this sitting down. on denny schaffer's show in new orleans, callsers demanded deportations. quote, i see nothing wrong with putting them on a bus and shipping them back to wherever they came from. a caller named alan told mr. schaffer, the law's the law. the senators filed their 844-page bill after 2:00 a.m. on wednesday. officially beginning what president obama and other supporters hope will be six-week effort to pass it in the senate by early june. hearings on the legislation, which tightens border security and offers an eventual path to citizenship, are set to begin on friday. that's from the "washington times." jacksonville, north carolina. arlene, good morning. democrat. caller: good morning. the gun background check situation. tammy baldwin was just on and she said something very interesting, she said, we already have background checks. so what's wrong with going a little bit more? and that's the problem. the problem is, you can't have a little bit. ce you
that this is the law of the land and going forward i think you will see that. >> host: one question from jim. he writes i'm 62 in good health, why not just go without until something comes of? >> guest: one reason is you will have to pay a fine. it's low in the first year, only $95. it goes up in a few years to 2% of hearing, or $700 or if you sign up for coverage although people worry the penalties are too low. but like anyone, as my mother used to tell me don't go a day without health insurance. you never know when you are going to have a concussion and you never know when you're going to be in a car accident. is it really a risk you want to take? >> host: going to ted from huntington new york on our republican line. good morning, you're on with jenny gold. >> caller: good morning. i would like to know about the policy you're in new york. i want to move out of new york. can this policy follow me you know to another state? or if -- >> host: do you have to change policies with each state you are in? is that what you're asking? >> caller: yes. >> guest: the thing about this lot is it's a state-by-state
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)